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Meyer Lemon Honey Vanilla Marmalade

Ingredients

  • 1 lb nice, ripe Meyer lemons
  • 1 C wildflower honey [TIP: That is wildflower honey - honey that actually has the fragrance of flowers. I use raw, unfiltered Michigan wildflower honey exclusively for this. A high-end orange flower honey would also be worth the investment.]
  • 1 C granulated suger
  • 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 C water
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Meyer Lemon Honey Vanilla Marmalade

Time: 15 minutes prep, 1-1/2 hours cook
Servings: 2 8oz jars
 

Directions

  1. Cut the ends off of each elmon and then slice them into thin disks, then quarter each disk
  2. Combine the honey, sugar and water over a medium-low flame
  3. Add the lemon pieces
  4. Cook at simmer for 1-1/2 hours, stirring occasionally
  5. Pour into clean warm jars
  6. Refrigerate
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Summary

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5 votes | 1002 views

If you llike a real marmalade, you will love this fragrantly sensual, sweet, yet tart, pure fruit product on a toasted and buttered English muffin, or as a glaze on a roast bird - cornish, rock, or squab - even chicken!

I have broken my recipe down to a basic, low investment, high return process. A minimum of prep time and slow cooking will produce a nice pair of pint jars that will last in the refrigerator for weeks - unless you eat them...

Reviews

  • Amos Miller
    March 20, 2012
    Hi, Bob! Great to hear from you. I cook to reduce this, so I go uncovered for the duration. The addition of the water seems to dilute and then reconcentrate the honey and it's unique flavor, which harmonizes quite well with Meyer and vanilla. In your area I imagine you get orange blossom honey - I'd use it in a heartbeat to bring out more of the orange in the Meyer lemons. Also, I appreciate the edge the rind gives, but you can reduce that partially or altogether by juicing the lemons, then scooping out all or most of the pith and membrane. Use all the juice, of course, and sliver or slice the rind as you wish when making the marmalade. Marmalade, of course, is traditionally made with the pith and bitter Seville oranges, but I say if you the one eating the dish, make it to your taste. If you have a vanilla bean, split it and let the seeds do their magic. I have no problem using pure vanilla extract as we go through a lot of it here. I save the whole beans for other dishes. Consider my suggestions carefully, then let me know what you think. I'd appreciate a review, if you feel it merits one. Best regards, Amos
    I've cooked/tasted this recipe!
    This is a variation
    1 person likes this review
    • Bob Vincent
      March 20, 2012
      Hi Amos:
      I made your lemon marmalade today and it turned out great. The only honey I had on hand was clover but the taste is still very nice. Probably not as tasty as wildflower or orange blossom but it certainly worked. Simmering for 1 1/2 hours was the perfect time which resulted in leaving a bit of tooth to the peel which I like. The sweet/tart flavor is much like Seville orange but with a lemon flavored theme. The deep amber color is beautiful. This marmalade has possibilties for both sweet and savory dishes. I am going to brine a butterflied chicken; slow smoke with Apple wood at 225^ for an hour and finish by roasting in the oven for a nice crisp skin. Teamed with your marmalade, Israeli couscous and grilled asparagus as sides it should make for a great meal. On the sweet side I'm thinking of sliced cream cheese poundcake grilled to golden brown on the BBQ, your lemon marmalade, a scoop of the best vanilla ice cream you can find and a sprig of mint. This is a keeper. Thanks for sharing!
      Best Regards,
      Bob
      I've cooked/tasted this recipe!
      1 reply
      • Amos Miller
        March 21, 2012
        Hey there, Bob! I could not be more delighted to learn of your success! Keep the marmalade refrigerated unless you processed the jar(s) in boiling water for 15 minutes. It thrills me to read of your plans for it's use. I hope you will let me know how these ideas turn out, and perhaps you will take a photo of the resulting dishes and post them right here for other members to appreciate. Outstanding! If you did can the marmalade, it will easily last a year on the shelf. Great cooking, Bob! - best regards, Amos

      Comments

      • Bob Vincent
        March 25, 2012
        Hi Amos:
        I posted a "Grilled Lemon Cream Cheesed Pound Cake with Amos' Lemon Marmalade" recipe yesterday. Your marmalade worked perfect with the pound cake. Thanks for sharing!
        Best Regards,
        Bob
        1 reply
        • Amos Miller
          March 26, 2012
          Thanks, Bob - I could not be more delighted! I'll look up your recipe. Extremely kind of you to mention me. Thanks, again - best wishes, Amos
        • Gilli Wrightson
          March 21, 2012
          Hi Amos I have forwarded your recipe to a friend of mine who loves making preserves will report back. Cheers Gilli
          • Amos Miller
            March 21, 2012
            Miss G. - Bob Vincent reviewed his good fortune with clover honey - so go for it - then let me know what your experience was with this recipe with a review. Can't wait to hear! And as I wrote to Gilli here, read my updated review and my comments here for a few additional ideas. This does require some stirring on the stove top and you need to reduce water content through evaporation, so I really am not comfortable recommending a crockpot for this recipe because I am not confident it would produce a good product. Use a saucepan, give it a stir every 15 minutes and keep an eye on the pot during the last 10. The pan will clean up quickly with hot water and a brush. Just watch your heat. Hope to hear from you soon!
            • Amos Miller
              March 21, 2012
              Hi, Gilli - read Bob's Review above for his experience, and refer to my updated Review above and my Comment below. This is, I humbly believe, a marmalade lover's product. Can't wait to get your review! Enjoy!!
              • Veronica Gantley
                March 21, 2012
                Hi Amos,
                I only have clover honey. Can I simmer it in the crockpot? Can I can it in a waterbath or will a pressure cooker be more ideal?
                1 reply
                • Amos Miller
                  March 21, 2012
                  Miss G. - Bob Vincent reviewed his good fortune with clover honey - so go for it - then let me know what your experience was with this recipe with a review. Can't wait to hear! And as I wrote to Gilli here, read my updated review and my comments here for a few additional ideas. This does require some stirring on the stove top and you need to reduce water content through evaporation, so I really am not comfortable recommending a crockpot for this recipe because I am not confident it would produce a good product. Use a saucepan, give it a stir every 15 minutes and keep an eye on the pot during the last 10. The pan will clean up quickly with hot water and a brush. Just watch your heat. Hope to hear from you soon!
                • Gilli Wrightson
                  March 21, 2012
                  Meyer lemons just coming into season here . They are fabulous. This marmalade sounds yummy
                  1 reply
                  • Amos Miller
                    March 21, 2012
                    Hi, Gilli - read Bob's Review above for his experience, and refer to my updated Review above and my Comment below. This is, I humbly believe, a marmalade lover's product. Can't wait to get your review! Enjoy!!
                  • Amos Miller
                    March 20, 2012
                    Hi, Patti - Read my review above, addressed to Bob. I lay out some options for modification of this recipe that may appeal to you more than my original posting. I do love this recipe because the addition of a scented honey plays so well. But you do have option on the amount of pith you use and the way you slice the rind. You can also remove all the pith and put it into a piece of cheesecloth and cook in the pot with the other ingredients, than discard the bag, thereby eliminating the pith, but keeping that touch of bitter that marmalade lovers appreciate. You can also boil the whole fruits in water, discard the water and repeat again, then take the fruit apart, remove the seeds and pith and make the marmalade, producing a 'tamer' version. Let me know what you do - you'll have fun with this one!


                    • Patti Vanderploeg
                      March 20, 2012
                      I just bought a bag of these Meyer lemons from the store the other day. I had not heard of them before and wasn't sure what I would do with them.....thanks Amos, now I know!

                      Patti Vanderploeg
                      1 reply
                      • Amos Miller
                        March 20, 2012
                        Hi, Patti - Read my review above, addressed to Bob. I lay out some options for modification of this recipe that may appeal to you more than my original posting. I do love this recipe because the addition of a scented honey plays so well. But you do have option on the amount of pith you use and the way you slice the rind. You can also remove all the pith and put it into a piece of cheesecloth and cook in the pot with the other ingredients, than discard the bag, thereby eliminating the pith, but keeping that touch of bitter that marmalade lovers appreciate. You can also boil the whole fruits in water, discard the water and repeat again, then take the fruit apart, remove the seeds and pith and make the marmalade, producing a 'tamer' version. Let me know what you do - you'll have fun with this one!
                      • Cindy McNamara
                        March 20, 2012
                        Oh Amos, I can hardly wait to get to my new kitchen in Alabama and get started on this one! I don't have high expectations for seeing Meyer lemons in LA (that's Lower Alabama for all y'all) so I'm going to grab a couple pounds and hide them in my car before we start the drive this weekend!
                        1 reply
                        • Amos Miller
                          March 20, 2012
                          Great to hear from you, Cindy! I take you're moving to a new home. Can't wait to see what you cook up!! Safe journey and please keep in touch. - Amos
                        • Bob Vincent
                          March 20, 2012
                          Hi Amos:
                          Our Meyer dwarf lemon tree is bounding with ripe fruit now. Last week I juiced over three gallons and froze the juice in plastic bags. Though the frozen juice works for many things fresh sqeezed is still best. I also started a batch of preserved lemons in a large Mason jar which will be ready in a month. This recipe is perfect timing for use of more lemons. This tree knows its job as we get three crops per year of more than 150 lemons each crop. Do you simmer covered or uncovered? I have added this to my Try Soon Folder--probably in the next couple of days. Thanks for sharing!
                          Best Regards,
                          Bob